jasongraceless
jasongraceless:


Look, I didn’t want to read this series. If you’re reading this right now because you think it’ll be fun, my advice is: close this blog right now. Believe whatever lie the school librarian told you about Percy Jackson, and try to lead a normal life. The series is dangerous. It’s scary. Most of the time, it gets you heartbroken in painful, nasty ways. If you’re a normal kid, reading this because you think it’s trivial, great. I envy you for being able to believe that none of this can influence you. But if you recognize yourself in this story— if you feel something stirring inside— stop reading immediately. You might be one of us. And once you know that, it’s only a matter of time before THEY sense it, too, and they’ll come for you. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.
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jasongraceless:

Look, I didn’t want to read this series. If you’re reading this right now because you think it’ll be fun, my advice is: close this blog right now. Believe whatever lie the school librarian told you about Percy Jackson, and try to lead a normal life. The series is dangerous. It’s scary. Most of the time, it gets you heartbroken in painful, nasty ways. If you’re a normal kid, reading this because you think it’s trivial, great. I envy you for being able to believe that none of this can influence you. But if you recognize yourself in this story— if you feel something stirring inside— stop reading immediately. You might be one of us. And once you know that, it’s only a matter of time before THEY sense it, too, and they’ll come for you. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Read More

ittickleslikecrazy

dulect:

cannibalsuxx:

ass-ume:

getsby:

koolkidseatgreens:

Well ok Kesha, maybe it’s because you’re an auto tuned peice of shit who shouldn’t be famous, you have no Buisness being in the music industry, it’s not even your music you fuck, someone else wrote it for you to record and them to auto tune yourself. And it’s not at all good . It’s not positive either. So complain some more.

I don’t know if you know this, tumblr user koolkidseatgreens, but Ke$ha is a certified genius. She has an IQ over 140 and an SAT score of 1500. When she was younger she would go to the library and do research for fun. Ke$ha is a both feminist and an advocate for equal marriage/rights for people of any sexuality, being a queer woman herself.

Ke$ha is a smart, professional woman, and just because she sings songs about wanting to let loose and have fun every once in a while doesn’t make her a piece of shit.

Ke$ha’s songs are meant to point out the sexism in our media. She treats men the same way many men in the music industry treat women, and she is hated on for it. Relentlessly. She sings on multiple occasions about taking charge in a sexual relationship, of how she only uses men for their body parts. She sexualizes men to make them uncomfortable. She sexualizes men for a reaction, so that people can both see why women are so uncomfortable with their sexualization and also to point out the inequality between the sexes both in the media and in the world at large.

She is judged so harshly for singing about things that make many men famous.

If you listen to Ke$ha’s deconstructed album you will see that she actually has some talent, which may be hard to hear because she does in fact use a fair amount of autotune. This is because of her genre and because of the kind of music she chooses to create as an artist. Ke$ha may not write her songs, but this doesn’t meant she isn’t a good artist or a good person. This doesn’t mean she deserves your harsh words. Some singers are good at writing, but that’s hardly a requirement. Last time I checked whether or not you can sing has nothing to do with whether or not you’re a poet.

You should not be calling anyone a piece of shit, my friend, especially someone you’ve never sat down and had a conversation (or even taken the time to wonder about her feelings!), but if anyone deserves that kind of language it’s not Ke$ha.

You may think that by shaming women for expressing their sexuality and having fun every once in a while, that you are somehow abolishing sexism. That in weeding out the less ‘deserving’ women you are gaining our sex more respect. This is not the case, and the fact that you and many others feel such a strong need to shame this woman who has done nothing wrong, especially not to you, shows that we still have a very far way to go.

I would reblog this a thousand times over

also Ke$ha was a song writer for britney spears

ittickleslikecrazy

duckygoodness:

EVERY SINGLE PERSON WHO REBLOGS THIS WILL GET THE FOLLOWING IN THEIR INBOX.

  • A BRIEF ORIGIN STORY
  • A SUPERPOWER OR THREE, MAYBE FOUR DEPENDING
  • A SUPERHERO OR VILLAIN NAME
  • YOU MIGHT ALSO GET AN ARCHNEMESIS WHO HAS REBLOGGED THIS ALREADY

AND YES I MEAN EVERY SINGLE PERSON WHO REBLOGS THIS. UNTIL, SAY, AUGUST 2015. A FULL YEAR. LONG ENOUGH, RIGHT?

LET’S DO THIS THING.

ittickleslikecrazy

troyethesexynugget:

wearetylerspeople:

troye-is-a-cutie-patootie:

selfless-gunman:

REBLOG IF YOUR OTP IS GAY

I need to prove my mom that it’s perfectly normal and common to ship two men (or women)

*reblogs 1000 times for each gay couple I ship*

Uhh Troyler, Phan, Jaspar, Hartbig I don’t think I have a straight ship..

I have so many gay ships omg
I only have like a few straight ships

ittickleslikecrazy
avataggart:

bibliomatsuri:

sapphireswimming:

discovering-gravity:

nicodiangelbabe:

kuro-michaelis:

heartnmavin:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.
In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.
Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.
I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.
This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.
Never forget.
"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This also applies to the Australian School system.

The American Public School System is quite literally shit. I was in a private school and was constantly taking AP and IB classes and then I transferred to a public school when I moved. I was SEVERAL years ahead of my peers who were doing things I had done several years prior.
I am rather ashamed at the American Public Schools…and the government who has allowed many Americans to receiver the shittiest education I can think of.

in my tenth grade creative writing glass i got a poor grade on my short story because it was a few pages too long and complex
i literally got a poor mark because i did more work than everyone else

when i was in first grade, we had a test that said “can you subtract _ from _?” and if you could, you would write the answer and if you couldn’t you would circle no. i ended up getting an F on that because i said yes for all of them and used negative numbers for the ones that applied.

I had already been doing first grade level work at home when we moved back to the states so even though I was ready to learn second grade, the school said I was too young to start first. Long story short, I went through second grade at home until they let me into first and for the next three years I learned nothing but multiplication tables and how to hate school. 

I’ve had issues with math since kindergarten (which is another story entirely) but I’ve always been really good at reading and languages. From third to fifth grade, I won my local school’s grade-wide spelling bee three years in a row.
In fifth grade, when I got up on stage to do the final round, people in the crowd were literally booing me. I know I was an unpopular brat, but - was I supposed to deliberately hold back in the one area I was actually good at just so the other kids could look better?
That’s just wrong.

In my first grade class the material was already so easy that my mom bought me a crossword puzzle book for me to work on after I’d finished my schoolwork. I’d finish whatever assignment we were given early and then sit there working on crosswords.
At some point in the year my teacher decided that I couldn’t have a pencil anymore (a bit of a long story: in my classroom there was something called the Clean Desk Fairy, who would give you toys if your desk was clean and organized. I never got a toy, so I got upset and wrote notes to everyone as the Clean Desk Fairy to tell them if their desks were clean or not) and so as soon as I finished my work she would take my pencil so I couldn’t write. 
In my second grade class, half the day was devoted to breaks - craft time, recess, play breaks. The only educational things I remember doing are playing coin/counting games, doing worksheets, watching videos, and going to the computer lab to watch different videos. The only thing I really learned that year was how to knit - yes, my teacher taught the entire class how to knit. 
On top of that, I was an advanced reader. The school I was attending only held classes up through third grade, and they didn’t have any books above a third grade reading level. It was hell. The only books we had in the classroom were tiny little books, shorter than chapter books even. We got read the book “No, David” in class. 
On top of all that, it turned out that I had learned the little bit of math that we’d covered wrong. I don’t remember exactly what it was, most likely multiplication tables, but some incredibly simple math facts had been taught to me incorrectly. 
And I don’t remember this, but apparently in school I liked to read encyclopedias. Whenever the class was allowed to pick books to read, that’s what I’d pick. My teachers complained to my mom that I should be reading fiction and not reading the encyclopedias cover-to-cover.
My mom noticed all this and pulled me out of public school to homeschool me. And I didn’t quite realize until now just how lucky I am to have her for a mom.

avataggart:

bibliomatsuri:

sapphireswimming:

discovering-gravity:

nicodiangelbabe:

kuro-michaelis:

heartnmavin:

snowyanna:

215-to-fit:

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

Fun story time. I loved to read. So much so, I was reading chapter books in kindergarden. I broke the record for reading points in elementary school. They actually had to start making up prizes for me. No one in the history of the school had ever read so many books in a year. Basically, my class liked me because I won those suckers pizza parties in my spare time.

In second grade, I had a teacher named Ms. Mobley who believed all children should be average. She flat out told my father that all children should make C’s, and should never strive for more than that.

Not only was she insane, she also would routinely spell things wrong for us to copy for our spelling tests. Later, when we spelled those words wrong on the test, she would mark us off. Yes, our own teacher was sabotaging us.

I should have been tested for gifted classes, but I was not. Why? Ms. Mobley didn’t believe in “gifted” children.

This teacher had tenure and could not be fired.

Never forget.

"The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win." 

This also applies to the Australian School system.

The American Public School System is quite literally shit. I was in a private school and was constantly taking AP and IB classes and then I transferred to a public school when I moved. I was SEVERAL years ahead of my peers who were doing things I had done several years prior.

I am rather ashamed at the American Public Schools…and the government who has allowed many Americans to receiver the shittiest education I can think of.

in my tenth grade creative writing glass i got a poor grade on my short story because it was a few pages too long and complex

i literally got a poor mark because i did more work than everyone else

when i was in first grade, we had a test that said “can you subtract _ from _?” and if you could, you would write the answer and if you couldn’t you would circle no. i ended up getting an F on that because i said yes for all of them and used negative numbers for the ones that applied.

I had already been doing first grade level work at home when we moved back to the states so even though I was ready to learn second grade, the school said I was too young to start first. Long story short, I went through second grade at home until they let me into first and for the next three years I learned nothing but multiplication tables and how to hate school. 

I’ve had issues with math since kindergarten (which is another story entirely) but I’ve always been really good at reading and languages. From third to fifth grade, I won my local school’s grade-wide spelling bee three years in a row.

In fifth grade, when I got up on stage to do the final round, people in the crowd were literally booing me. I know I was an unpopular brat, but - was I supposed to deliberately hold back in the one area I was actually good at just so the other kids could look better?

That’s just wrong.

In my first grade class the material was already so easy that my mom bought me a crossword puzzle book for me to work on after I’d finished my schoolwork. I’d finish whatever assignment we were given early and then sit there working on crosswords.

At some point in the year my teacher decided that I couldn’t have a pencil anymore (a bit of a long story: in my classroom there was something called the Clean Desk Fairy, who would give you toys if your desk was clean and organized. I never got a toy, so I got upset and wrote notes to everyone as the Clean Desk Fairy to tell them if their desks were clean or not) and so as soon as I finished my work she would take my pencil so I couldn’t write. 

In my second grade class, half the day was devoted to breaks - craft time, recess, play breaks. The only educational things I remember doing are playing coin/counting games, doing worksheets, watching videos, and going to the computer lab to watch different videos. The only thing I really learned that year was how to knit - yes, my teacher taught the entire class how to knit. 

On top of that, I was an advanced reader. The school I was attending only held classes up through third grade, and they didn’t have any books above a third grade reading level. It was hell. The only books we had in the classroom were tiny little books, shorter than chapter books even. We got read the book “No, David” in class. 

On top of all that, it turned out that I had learned the little bit of math that we’d covered wrong. I don’t remember exactly what it was, most likely multiplication tables, but some incredibly simple math facts had been taught to me incorrectly. 

And I don’t remember this, but apparently in school I liked to read encyclopedias. Whenever the class was allowed to pick books to read, that’s what I’d pick. My teachers complained to my mom that I should be reading fiction and not reading the encyclopedias cover-to-cover.

My mom noticed all this and pulled me out of public school to homeschool me. And I didn’t quite realize until now just how lucky I am to have her for a mom.